The Latest Twists and Turns in Japan’s Economic Battle

Since the election of Shinzo Abe as Prime Minister in 2012, Japan has instituted a number of bold economic reforms (dubbed “Abenomics”) to try to jolt the country’s economy back to health after almost a quarter-century of stagnation. These reforms included increased government spending, more purchases of government bonds by the country’s central bank, deregulation, and new international trade agreements. Recently, however, Abenomics has hit a bit of a snag.

Topics: Japan Blog Abenomics

Could Brazil Be the Next Japan and India?

In recent years the world has experienced two elections in large countries that ushered in new governments pledging dramatic economic reforms and led to surging stock markets. In Japan in December 2012, the election of Shinzo Abe and his Liberal Democratic Party led to economic reforms known as “Abenomics” and big stock market gains in early 2013. In India, the election in May of Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party also led to higher stock prices. Could Brazil’s stock market similarly benefit from its upcoming election?

Topics: Japan Blog Political Risk Brazil India

How Long Can Bond Yields Stay Low?

Despite numerous predictions that bond yields would soar (and therefore bond prices would fall), yields have actually fallen so far in 2014. After rising from record lows last year, the yield on 10-year US treasury bonds is currently around 2.5%, still far below its typical historical range. How long can bond yields stay so low? The answer is “possibly a very long time” based on the experiences of other countries.

Topics: Treasuries Japan Blog Bonds Yield

The Biggest Political Risk

We recently discussed the rise in political risk that investors have had to deal with over the past few years. But where is this risk most likely to have a meaningful impact on US investors? The answer, perhaps surprisingly, is East Asia.

Topics: Japan Blog Political Risk Asia China Iraq Ukraine Syria Middle East Russia

Checking in on Abenomics

When Shinzo Abe was elected as Japan’s Prime Minister in December 2012, he launched a bold plan of economic reforms that became known as “Abenomics”. These reforms included increased government spending, more purchases of government bonds by the country’s central bank, deregulation, and new international trade agreements. The aim was to jolt the country out of two decades of stagnation that had been characterized by deflation and mediocre economic growth.

Topics: Yen Japan Blog Deflation Abenomics